Our launch last fall proved that the Hackerboat hardware was working fine (other than the GPS) but that the software needed a complete rewrite. We've been working on that for the last few minutes. Debugging is a bit on the slow side, but we anticipate being ready to get back in the water in the next couple of weeks. We will be at both MakerFaire Bay Area and Toorcamp with the Hackerboat in tow. This weekend, we're going to put some paint on the boat to it looks a bit better in preparation for the next launch and for public show. There will be pictures! But let's talk about the systems in preparation to talk about the software.

The current electronics configuration of the Hackerboat has a bit of a Rube Goldberg quality. The underlying intent is to build a system out of relatively small modules that can be added to without major hardware surgery. Here's a schematic diagram of the various bits and pieces. Dark red is power and power control, green is computers, yellow is propulsion, orange is communication, blue is sensors, and purple is non-propulsion actuators.

Hackerboat-Systems-Diagram

The first thing to notice is that we have two on-board computers -- a Beaglebone and an Arduino. The intent is that the the Arduino will handle all of the low-level real time functions while the Beaglebone handles all of the higher-level navigation, obstacle avoidance, and mission functions. Among other things, the relatively more power hungry Beaglebone can be put into a low-power sleep mode for extended periods, especially while in the open ocean. On the flip side, we can use the Linux environment and fast processor on the Beaglebone to support all manner of cool navigational modes and mission applications.

The communications is likewise a layer cake. Our ship to shore radio is a Ubiquiti 900 MHz Ethernet bridge. The shore side radio has a directional antenna built in to the radio and the ship side uses an external antenna on the mast. For internal data on the boat, we use a standard WiFi router. This means we don't have to futz with waterproof Ethernet cabling (expensive and troublesome)... and we can add new equipment to the boat for the cost of a WiFi interface.

Right now, the sensor fitout is very basic. We have an IMU/magnetometer combo for heading, a GPS for position, and start/stop buttons on the outside of the boat. We're planning to add cameras next, and of course we have the option to mount any sort of instruments we like for mission requirements later.

Next update will be painting, and after that I will get into our software architecture.

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